DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

My Terms

When defining my terms, I relied upon educator Dean Eastman (2000) who summarized democratic educational space as “every day bringing every student into the mix.” Everyone who shared the public spaces at once became student and instructor, members of our temporary educational community, sharing insights from their own interpretations and perspectives of art.

For the most part, my choices of what I classified as “public art” were based upon the same guidelines limiting Bach and Gray (1983), who defined it as “works that are accessible daily to the public without charge” (Guide, p. vii). I didn’t include as many architectural works as they did since those have been frequently and thoroughly discussed in other publications.[1] Additionally, I used the same geographical groupings they did. I did not include all ten areas found in their Guide, but chose only two regions immediately bordering Lake Michigan, the areas through which I walk on a frequent basis and are easily accessible to all SAIC students. Finally, I included a few “temporary” pieces if those whom I had interviewed frequently mentioned them.


[1] A quick Google or Amazon search of “Chicago Architectural Sculpture” will reveal any number of publications, or, if the reader would prefer, ze may step into CAF bookstore located at 224 S. Michigan whose numerous Chicago architectural pictorial and theoretical books could fill an entire bookshelf—or library, as evidenced in AIC’s vast Burnham Ryerson Architectural Library. It was at CAF bookstore in 2009 that writing an updated tour of Chicago’s public art was first suggested to me.

 

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.